CLINICS

Clinics (Sao Paulo). 2017 June; 72(6): 351-357.
doi:10.6061/clinics/2017(06)04

Copyright © 2017 CLINICS

Language assessment of children with severe liver disease in a public service in Brazil

Erica Macêdo de-Paula I * , Gilda Porta II , Ana Cristina Aoun Tannuri III , Uenis Tannuri III , Debora Maria Befi-Lopes I

Departamento de Fisioterapia, Fonoaudiologia e Terapia Ocupacional, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, BR

Unidade de Hepatologia, Instituto da Crianca, Hospital das Clinicas HCFMUSP, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, BR

Divisão de Cirurgia Pediatrica e Unidade de Transplante de Figado, Instituto da Crianca, Hospital das Clinicas HCFMUSP, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, BR

*Corresponding author. E-mail: ericamp@gmail.com

received December 12, 2016; revised February 15, 2017; accepted March 10, 2017.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this research was to compare language development (expressive and receptive skills) in children awaiting liver transplantation with that of children who have already undergone the surgical procedure.

METHODS:

An observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted with 76 children divided into groups, as follows: 31 children who were candidates for liver transplantation (Group 1; G1), 45 children who had already undergone liver transplantation (Group 2; G2), and a control group (CG) of 60 healthy, normally developing children. Health status information was gathered, and the Test of Early Language Development (TELD)-3 was used to assess language skills. Family household monthly income data were also gathered using a specific questionnaire.

RESULTS:

G1 had poorer language performance compared with G2 and the CG. G2 had lower language performance when compared with the CG. However, when considering the TELD-3 standard scores, G2 had scores within normal limits. The regression analysis indicated age as a risk factor for language deficits in Group 1 and family income as a risk factor for language deficits in G2.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results suggested that children with chronic liver disease have delays in language development. Transplanted children have linguistic performance within normal limits, but their scores tended to be lower than the CG.

Keywords: Child Language, Language Development, Language Development Disorders, Liver Transplantation, Language Tests


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